STAAR® End-of-Course Exam (High School)

$59.95

The goal of the High School STAAR® guide is to provide teachers with strategies, models, and graphic organizers to present to their students with the results being improved writing and reading skills and scores.

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The guide begins with a brief introduction of the Jane Schaffer Writing Program®’s (JSWP) methodology, including correct and official instructional delivery and student application of terminology, color-coding, chunking, and ratios.

With the foundation intact, ELA teachers may train students to approach annotating the STAAR®’s multiple-choice passages with the same color-coding that we apply in the writing. Knowing how to infer tone and meaning depends on close reading strategies. In our two-day workshop, we provide teachers with strategies and practice on the annotation of texts.

JSWP’s Shaping Sheet is a popular graphic organizer that assists students in learning how to effectively edit, revise, and proof in their own writing. Once students learn how to edit, revise, and proof their own writing, that knowledge transfers as they confront the editing and revising questions on the EOC.

Then, on to the Expository and Persuasive essays. We begin with “You Know More Than You Think You Do,” a weekly or bimonthly activity that prepares students to write on various historical, cultural, literary, political, personal, scientific, and sports-related topics to answer any prompt (HELPPSS). The guide provides models and instructions on our proven approach to teaching the brainstorming, planning, thinking, and writing process that results in high scores on the 26-line Expository and Persuasive essays.

Guide: 72 pages

Graphic Organizers: 20 pages

“Thanks, Jane Schaffer Writing Program®, for helping Rising Scholars Academy of South Texas reach our 97% success story!” – Lucinda Zamora Wiley, Department Chair

9th Grade Standards

9th Grade

    • (13) Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
      • (A) plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
      • (B) structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
      • (C) revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
      • (D) edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
      • (E) revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.
    • (15) Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
      • (A) write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:
        • (i) effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
        • (ii) rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
        • (iii) a controlling idea or thesis;
        • (iv) an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; and
        • (v) relevant information and valid inferences;
    • (16)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
      • (A)  a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
      • (B)  consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views;
      • (C)  counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
      • (D)  an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; and
      • (E)  an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas.
    • (17)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
        • (i)  more complex active and passive tenses and verbals (gerunds, infinitives, participles);
        • (ii)  restrictive and nonrestrictive relative clauses; and
        • (iii)  reciprocal pronouns (e.g., each other, one another);
      • (B)  identify and use the subjunctive mood to express doubts, wishes, and possibilities; and
      • (C)  use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex).
    • (18)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  use conventions of capitalization; and
      • (B)  use correct punctuation marks including:
        • (i)  quotation marks to indicate sarcasm or irony;
        • (ii)  comma placement in nonrestrictive phrases, clauses, and contrasting expressions; and
        • (iii)  dashes to emphasize parenthetical information.
    • (19)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

10th Grade Standards

    • (13)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
      • (B)  structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
      • (C)  revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
      • (D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
      • (E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.
    • (15)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:
        • (i)  effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
        • (ii)  rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
        • (iii)  a controlling idea or thesis;
        • (iv)  an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; and
        • (v)  relevant information and valid inferences;
      • (C)  write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that
        • (i)  extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
        • (ii)  addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
        • (iii)  analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author’s use of stylistic or rhetorical devices
    • (16)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
      • (A)  a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
      • (B)  consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views (i.e., in the author’s own words and not out of context);
      • (C)  counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
      • (D)  an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
      • (E)  an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas; and
      • (F)  a range of appropriate appeals (e.g., descriptions, anecdotes, case studies, analogies, illustrations).
    • (17)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
        • (i)  more complex active and passive tenses and verbals (gerunds, infinitives, participles);
        • (ii)  restrictive and nonrestrictive relative clauses; and
        • (iii)  reciprocal pronouns (e.g., each other, one another);
      • (B)  identify and use the subjunctive mood to express doubts, wishes, and possibilities; and
      • (C)  use a variety of correctly structured sentences (e.g., compound, complex, compound-complex).
    • (18)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
      • (A)  use conventions of capitalization; and
      • (B)  use correct punctuation marks including:
        • (i)  comma placement in nonrestrictive phrases, clauses, and contrasting expressions;
        • (ii)  quotation marks to indicate sarcasm or irony; and
        • (iii)  dashes to emphasize parenthetical information.
    • (19)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

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