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August 5-7, 2019: Response to Literature, Expository/Informational Writing Across-the-Curriculum, and Argumentation

$219.95$419.95

Participant : 1

Registration Deadline: July 29, 2019

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August 5, 2019: Teaching Analytical Response to Literature,219.95
August 6, 2019: Teaching Expository/Informational Writing Across-the-Curriculum (3-8), 219.95
August 7, 2019: Argumentation, 219.92
Two Days: $319.95
Three Days: $419.95
Location:

Coastline Christian Academy
1801 North Loop Road
Alameda, CA 94502

9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.

Contact for Curriculum or Purchasing: Dr. Deborah E. Louis (info@janeschaffer.wpengine.com)

Questions about Curriculum or Purchasing? 214.946.3385

Additional information

Number of Days Attending

August 5, August 6, August 7, Two Days, Three Days

Details

Dates: 

August 5: Teaching Analytical Response to Literature
August 6: Teaching Expository/Informational Writing Across-the-Curriculum
August 7: Argumentation

Time: 9:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M.

What to Wear: Dress comfortably. Layer your clothing.

What to Bring: We’ll provide your guides and pens and post-it notes, but feel free to bring your favorite note-taking materials, such as tape-flags and highlighters. You may also bring your tablet or iPad to review our digital products and approaches, but a device is not required.

Questions about Curriculum or Purchasing? 214.946.3385

Email: info@janeschaffer.wpengine.com

August 5, 2019 - Analytical Response to Literature

Teaching Analytical Response to Literature

The workshop provides English Language Arts teachers with training on the teaching of literary analysis, also known as response to literature. From the very simple model of the Cinderella paragraph to Advanced Placement® interpretations, this guide reveals an academic approach to writing about literature.

The standards-based curriculum guide demonstrates alignment with both the Common Core State Standards and the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS).

The scaffolding of skills includes Jane’s prewriting strategies, student-centered terminology, color-coding, and Web-off-the-Word™, Jane’s breakthrough approach to commentary and vocabulary development. From terminology to final draft essays, this workshop is designed to assist the English language arts teacher with strategies and techniques that yield successful writers.

  • Terminology and methodology
  • Response to literature paragraph model
  • Gathering and evaluating CDs
  • Building insightful commentary
  • Editing, revising, proofing
  • Prompt construction
  • Collaborative and paired writing
  • Sample timelines/pacing plans
  • Introduction to thesis, introductions, and conclusions
  • Scaffolding/RTI/ELL
  • Revising and editing
  • Weaving – Leaving the formula behind
  • Two-chunk response to literature paragraphs
  • Quotations and lead-ins
  • In-depth study of thesis, introductions, conclusions
  • G/T; Pre-AP; AP solutions
  • Google docs template for Response to Literature

August 6, 2019 - Expository

Teaching Expository/Informational Writing Across-the-Curriculum

Affectionately referred to as our “All-Staff” training, this workshop provides teachers of 3rd thru 8th grade students with strategies, prompts, and practice for writing in all classes — not just English Language Arts classes.

ELA teachers continue to teach the writing process, but in this workshop all teachers learn how to effectively integrate writing into their curricula.

We begin with common terminology for writing, so that students and teachers in all content areas can speak the same language when it comes to writing. Then, in our JSWP ratio discussion and body paragraph structure, we demonstrate how career and technology, English language arts, fine arts, mathematics, physical education, social studies, science, and world languages teachers guide their students to understand the writing requirement differences of their content areas from ELA classes. We examine the techniques of summarizing and writing informational texts and practice the one-chunk paragraph for both non text-based and text-based writing. In a one-day workshop, our focus is on the organization of a body paragraph. We end the day with the introduction and the conclusion of the essay. In our two-day workshop, we expand the knowledge base into two-chunk paragraphs, text-based embedding of quotations, and effective prompt writing techniques.

Writing prompts and/or sample paragraphs are included for the core subjects, as well as career and technology, fine arts, physical education, religious studies, and world languages.

The workshop is divided into three parts. Part I provides teachers with strategies regarding non-text-based writing — “writing about what you know.” Part II provides teachers with an understanding of how to teach students the importance of summarizing, including finding the main idea and evaluating evidence (concrete details). Part III instructs teachers on techniques in teaching text-based writing skills, including citing evidence (concrete details) through embedded quotations from primary and secondary resources.

Following the gradual release of responsibility model (“I Do,” “We Do,” “You Do”), we begin with common terminology for writing, so that students and teachers in all content areas speak the same language when it comes to writing. Then, in our JSWP ratio discussion and body paragraph structure, we demonstrate how career and technology education, engineering, English language arts, fine arts, health, mathematics, physical education, social studies, science, technology, world languages, and all other specialized teachers guide their students to understand the writing requirement differences in their content areas. In other words, writing an analysis for a lab report differs from writing a literary analysis. We examine summarization and writing informational texts and practice the one-chunk paragraph for both non text-based and text-based writing. In the first two sections, our focus is on the organization of a body paragraph. We end the series with providing instruction on how to effectively embed quotations from primary and secondary sources, producing an introduction and a conclusion, and introducing the two-chunk paragraph.

Writing prompts and/or sample paragraphs are included for the core subjects, as well as career and technology, fine arts, physical education, religious studies, and world languages.

Included in this webinar:

  • Access to the JSWP trainer and/or Dr. Louis for questions that might arise after the training
  • Recorded sessions for participants who are absent (Policy: Participants who are absent must complete an assignment prior to earning credit for that particular session.)
  • Differentiation strategies:
    • The JSWP approach instills a sense of confidence and understanding of the thinking and writing process for the following students:
      • English as a second language
      • English language learners (ELL)
      • Special education (SPED)
      • Struggling writers
    • The JSWP approach trains advanced students to weave concrete details and commentary and develop syntactical and stylistic techniques, which lead to more sophisticated academic essays
      • Advanced Placement®
      • AVID
      • Gifted and Talented
      • International Baccalaureate
      • Pre-AP®
  • Comprehensive teacher’s guide
  • Unbound masters of student graphic organizers for easy copying
  • STAAR and SBAC handouts
  • Zipper bag with set of pens for color-coding technique
  • Newsletter subscription
  • CEU certificate of completion

August 7, 2019 - Argumentation

Teaching Argumentation

Many teachers ask, “What is the difference between ‘persuasion’ and ‘argumentation’?” Even though people may use these terms interchangeably, one way to delineate the two is to think of “persuasion” as convincing people to act differently and “argumentation” as convincing people to think differently, the latter of which endures.

In this one-day workshop, teachers learn the Jane Schaffer Writing Program® methodology and how that methodology applies to the argumentation process. Strategies include how to 1) obtain the facts of an issue from primary and secondary sources, evaluating their relevance to the topic at hand as well as the thesis statement; 2) acknowledge both sides of an issue by understanding concession and confutation, also known as counterargument or counterclaim; 3) refute the other side’s position; 4) develop and synthesize ideas in an organized, logical, and rational manner; 5) embed quotations; 6) create effective commentary or analysis; 7) produce a debatable thesis; and 8) begin and end an essay with an effective introduction and conclusion.

As with all JSWP workshops, the focus starts with the body paragraphs, then shifts to the essay as a whole. Four argumentation layouts provide differentiation for On-Level, SPED, ELL, G/T, Honors, and AP®/IB students with a special section on the ACT®. In addition, instruction on classical elements, such as audience, purpose, and occasion and Aristotle’s artistic proofs (ethos, logos, and pathos) provide insight on how orators and writers create a unique voice and style. The JSWP shaping sheet helps students to edit and revise their drafts to explore grammatical areas of strength and weakness and to create a variety of sentence types, openings, and lengths prior to producing a final draft.

A two-day workshop allows teachers time to practice a synthesis type question where participants select multiple sources to defend a thesis while acknowledging the validity of others’ perspectives. Teachers have more time to ask questions relative to situations that arise in the classroom; to produce prompts that coincide with a district’s or campus’ scope and sequence; design a model to be implemented during the introduction of argumentation to students; and discuss problem areas and research techniques.

Pricing and Payment Information

August 5: Teaching Analytical Response to Literature, 219.95
August 6: Teaching Expository/Informational Writing Across the Curriculum, 219.95
August 6: Teaching Argumentation, 219.95
Two Days: $319.95
Three Days: $419.95
For Individuals: Credit Cards or Purchase Orders Accepted. No Personal Checks.

For Departments, Campuses, and Districts: Credit Cards, Company Checks, or Purchase Orders Accepted.

For Purchase Orders and Company Checks:

  • Please contact info@janeschaffer.wpengine.com to obtain W9 and/or any other vendor requirements your school or district needs.
  • Purchase orders and company checks should be made payable to Louis Educational Concepts, LLC, 400 South Zang Blvd., Ste. 1425, Dallas, Texas 75208. You may fax your P.O. to 214.943.9447 or email it to info@louisconcepts.com.
  • Your P.O. must arrive on or before the registration deadline to reserve your seat and finalize your registration.

Questions? 214.946.3385

Email: info@janeschaffer.wpengine.com

Participant : 1