Teacher observing students' conversation

The “MISS”NOMER

As educators, we help students to find the right words. Without us, without education, the poverty of words results in frustration and anger. So, I am always proud of teachers who build their students’ vocabulary everyday to help them express themselves. Because words are important.

I work with teachers everyday, some of the greatest minds in the world. I’m not talking about celebrities; I’m talking about everyday teachers. And something that I would like us to do is to stop allowing students to address us only as “Miss” or “Mister.” In many classrooms all ofver the nation, instead of students calling us by our names, like Ms. Vaughn or Dr. Pena, students will just say, “Miss” or “Mister.” For example, “Miss, where do I put this paper?”

You are an important person in the lives of your students and in the world. You are a TEACHER. You are valuable. Please do not let your students devalue you and the profession by calling you the same name as what we would call a waitress whom we’ve never met! As English teachers, we know the power of language. As historians, you have witnessed the effect of a historical motivating or misspoken word. As math and science teachers, you have seen what one wrong symbol can do to an equation or a chemical reaction, respectively. LANGUAGE IS IMPORTANT.Â

I know you have a tremendous amount of work on your plate, and you’re thinking, “Deborah, I have a lot more problems to deal with than this!” But I would like to convince you otherwise. How can you expect students, parents, administrators, and the global community to respect our profession when they don’t even call us by our given names?

I remember the first time a student called me “Miss.” It was in 1994. My head did a 360, and I turned to the young eleventh grade student and asked, “Why did you call me ‘Miss?’ My name is Ms. Louis.”

“Well, it’s easier to call you Miss, and our other teachers let us call them Miss.”

“Really?!”

“Uh, huh.”

“Well, I will call you Mr. Davis, and you will call me Ms. Louis. I will not answer to ‘Miss,’ just as I expect that you wouldn’t want to answer to ‘Hey, you’!”

(This was back when I was calling my eleventh grade students by their last names in order to raise the bar of formality and expectations among a teacher and her students. In the hallway, I called him Mark.)

If I were Aretha Franklin, I’d break out into R-E-S-P-E-C-T right now. As a teacher, I know how hard my colleagues work to better their students’ lives, to better our nation’s future. If you do not demand respect in your classroom, you will not get it.

I am thankful for the adults in my life who made me grow into the woman I am today. Trust me, it wasn’t easy for any of them. So thank you, Mom and Dad. But also, thank you Mrs. Tanner (1st grade); Mrs. Lawrence (2nd grade); Mrs. Hyman (3rd grade); Mrs. Crews (4th grade Math); Mr. Crook (7th grade Social Studies); Mr. Kennemer (9th grade Biology); Mrs. Nickel (11th grade English); Mr. Wilbanks (12th grade Government) and Mrs. Simmons (12th grade English).

When I say their names, they live and thrive again. They were important then, and they still are.

We will never rise in our professional status if we do not even have a name.

Keep writing, reading, and teaching!

Warm regards,

Dr. Louis (not “Miss”)

 

Dr. Deborah E. Louis

Ph.D. in Humanities

Dr. Deborah E. Louis' passion for educational excellence began as a classroom teacher. For sixteen years, Deborah taught On-level, Pre-AP®, and Advanced Placement® English Language Arts to secondary students of diverse ethnicities and learning styles. In 2010, Deborah purchased the Jane Schaffer Writing Program®, and along with her non-profit organization, Center for Educational ReVision (CerV®), her goal and that of her national team of experts is to provide the highest quality professional learning and mentoring to teachers in the areas of writing, advanced academics, high-stakes testing, and educational technology. Through webinars, workshops, job-embedded training, and teaching materials, Deborah strives to ReVision the educational system, combining traditional and flipped approaches to professional learning for teachers of grades K-12; and differentiating for Special Education, English Language Learners, and Gifted and Talented. Although her mission takes her all over the United States and abroad, Deborah lives in Dallas, Texas USA. She loves music, dancing, archetypal psychology, and continuous learning opportunities.

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