Blog

  • Week Three: Some of you might have asked your students to come to class today having watched a sports event on the weekend and bringing examples of play-by-play CDs and color commentator CMs. If so, use the first half of the class having them write samples in a carousel fashion on paper attached to the walls of the classroom  (with music, of course) and then reviewing the accuracy of their findings. 

  • Week Three: Some of you might have asked your students to come to class today having watched a sports event on the weekend and bringing examples of play-by-play CDs and color commentator CMs. If so, use the first half of the class having them write samples in a carousel fashion on paper attached to the walls of the classroom  (with music, of course) and then reviewing the accuracy of their findings. 

  • Upcoming Webinars: September 17 and October 7

  • Dear Dr. D'
    I want to teach the writing program, a literary work, grammar, vocabulary. I don't know where to start or how to get it all in. I wanted to begin with Mildred Taylor's Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry; but I'm now thinking I should start with a short story. What should I do?
    Alison

  • Jane's #4 Non-Negotiable: Common Terminology for the Paragraph and Essay Helps Students Learn.

  • Getting to know your students is paramount in your year being a successful one. That's one of the reasons why the Diagnostic Essay is important that first week. Pretty soon, you'll discover who your kids "really" are, and some or many of them might be longing for "the call for adventure." For those of you teaching literature where loss is involved, you might consider discussing "The Orphan" with your students and tell them at different stages of our lives, we all experience this archetype.
  • Dear Dr. D'

    I am a high school English teacher, and because the Writing section of Common Core does not list Literature, I am expected to teach non-fiction for writing purposes. Students need to learn and write about the classics! How do I keep my job and my conscience in tact?

    Yours truly,

    Distraught

  • I am constantly being asked for a Scope and Sequence, and I've always been reticent to provide one, because I want teachers to have flexibility. Sometimes, an entity will put out a Curriculum, and then it becomes mandatory and leaves no room for teacher flexibility and creativity. Each week, I will provide a guide, and that's what it is -- a guide -- you know best what is good for your students. I am here to honor that and to provide assistance. 
  • Dear Dr. D',

    My 10th grade American Literature students just don't get it. I mean, when they are reading a fictional piece or a non-fictional piece, they don't know how to infer. They don't know how to look deeper into a piece. They don't want to look deeper, and they shut down. Please HELP! I'm at my wits' end.

    - Shannon

    Dear Shannon,

  • By Deborah E. Louis, Ph.D.

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